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Mineral booster

Mineral booster

Bone broth

The following recipe is for a bare-minimum broth—not for a soup stock, which would include onions, carrots, celery and spices. It contains only three ingredients: bones, water and vinegar. The vinegar is there to help pull more minerals out of the bones.
 
The broth can be made from meat, poultry and fish bones or from seafood shells. It is best to use bones from pastured farm animals, free-range poultry and wild-caught fish.
 
Make a habit of cooking bone broth. In preparation, save bones and shells from foods you eat and collect them in a plastic bag in your deep freezer. When you have accumulated enough to fill half of a large pot, it is time to make the broth.
 
You can prepare this broth on the stovetop at the lowest possible heat setting or in a slow cooker (such as a Crock-Pot). Either way, slow cooking gets every drop of nutrients out of the bones.
 
Ingredients

Bones from meat, poultry or fish, or shells from shellfish
1/3 cup (80 ml) vinegar, preferably raw unfiltered apple cider vinegar
 
Instructions

1.     Fill a stockpot about halfway with bones.
2.     Add water to cover plus a little more.
3.     Add the vinegar and bring to a boil. Skim off and discard any foam that forms on top.
4.     Cover and simmer over the lowest possible heat for 12 to 24 hours.
5.     Pour the broth through a strainer or colander into another large pot and discard the bones.
6.     Strain the broth again through a cheesecloth-covered strainer to catch any small particles that might have
        made it through the first time around.
7.     Divide the broth into containers. Store for up to a week in the refrigerator or up to a year in the freezer.
 
If you are keeping broth in the refrigerator, be sure to boil it before you consume it. Drink the broth as a powerful mineral tonic—heat it up and flavor it with salt, pepper, chopped fresh herbs and scallions. You can also fill an ice cube tray with the broth and then use a cube or two when cooking greens or sauces. Use bone broth instead of water when cooking grains or making a soup.

Benefits of bone broth

Indulgences over the holidays, especially of the sweet and spirited kinds can lead to a depletion of our mineral reserves. And that in turn can lead to susceptibility to colds and flus in the New Year.
 
Bone broth is known to provide easily absorbable minerals and trace minerals.
 
In addition it contains glucosamine and chondroitin, which both support the cartilage that acts as a cushion between the bones in our joints. Glucosamine and chondroitin may be helpful in cases of osteoarthritis.
 
Bone broth nourishes all body parts that contain collagen. These include skin, bones, muscles, blood vessels, intestines, corneas, mucus membranes, connective tissue, tendons, ligaments and intervertebral discs.
 
It also contains glutamine, an important fuel for cells in the immune system, small intestine and kidneys. Therefore, it fortifies us in combating colds and flus and supports kidney as well as adrenal health.


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